Professional Headshots - Tips And Tricks For Success

 Preparing for headshots can be difficult as everybody wants to present the best version of themselves in the best possible way. By preparing fully in advance, the headshots produced will be the best version of the person and will most likely book them the most work.

Clothing

There are many factors to consider when dressing for a professional head-shot. Traditionally, headshots are only torso, shoulders, and head. This means that the main focus on clothing should be based around the top ebing worn for the shoot. The best tops to wear for headshots should be plain and simple, so there is no distraction from the face. It is also key to note that some headshots will be converted into black and white, so this may effect clothing choices.

A few styles to avoid are as follows - 

  • Logos - These are a bad idea for headshots as the bottom of the frame can easily be cropped. This could cut part of the logo and lead to it becoming misinterpreted.
  • Patterns - Depending on how close the frame is to the subject, patterned clothing can be distorted and distracting, therefore taking the focus away from the face. That said and done, if you have a favourite pattered or brightly coloured top, it can work so bring it along - ensure you have neutral options too.
  • Necklines - It is best to avoid high-neck tops. Women should instead opt for V-neck tops and rounded necklines. For men, it is best to wear t-shirts or collared shirts


Face

When thinking about the face, it is undoubtedly best that makeup is kept natural and light - an everyday look. As the camera will pick up colours in greater detail than with the naked eye. For men, being well groomed- think about trimming hair and beards, or having a fresh shave. If you have stubble make sure it is recently trimmed to an even length. Check grooming on eyebrows, ears, and nose, which is well worth a mention too :) This will come across best on camera. It is important to look the same in the headshots as day-to-day life., as clients are hiring based on those photos. Remember, these are shots that represent a personal brand, so it is key to come across in photos the way desired.


Angles

Faces have many different angles and most people prefer certain angles of their face over other. Before the shoot, take a look in the mirror and check out which angle you like best, to ensure the photos come out in the way you desire. It’s great idea to take selfies of angles you love and show your photographer, so they have a clear idea to recreate the look you like in a super professional looking shoot. Whilst on shoot, it is important to communicate with the photographer and ask which angles they think are best through the lens. It is a good idea to focus on the most favourable features, as angles can maximise the effect of these in photos. It’s best to follow the direction of the photographer as they are the professional and can see how the image will look through the lens.


Relax 

As these headshots are for personal brand and to gain work, they should appear natural and relaxed. It can be hard to appear natural in a new environment where it is crucial to look good. Here are a few tips to keep a natural look in a headshot - 

  • Show genuine emotion - Don’t fake a smile, it can look harsh and uncomfortable. If looking natural is becoming a struggle, the photographer will have tips on getting the best facial expression.
  • Engage - This is all about having the right attitude towards the shoot an giving it the best effort. If a subject goes in with a great attitude, they will appear engaging and get a great shot.


Contact Soul Rebel Headshots

Soul Rebel Headshots provide corporate, commercial, and actor headshots. To get in touch or look at Kimberley Archer’s portfolio - click here


What to wear for my headshots?

Depending on which industry you are planning on going into, you might want to get some great headshots taken so that you can portray a good image to the people you are going to be connecting with. You never know how much of an impact a good headshot can make when it comes to landing you that crucial acting or modelling role that you have been hoping for. So, one of the questions that is asked a lot is what should you wear for your headshot? Great question! Let’s take a look at the answer.


In General

You don’t want to get too caught up with the clothes that you are wearing. Some people opt for something cute, and that is in fashion right now. However, this can take away from the overall headshot and make it look like it is unprofessional This is not the kind of message that you want to be sending to those that you are trying to impress. You want them to think that you are confident, while making sure that they are looking at the main features of the picture such as your eyes and the rest of your face.

Your Skin Tone

Look at your skin tone and the colour of your eyes before you decide on an outfit. Like we said above, there should be nothing in the headshot that will detract from your face. So, you don’t want to choose anything that has patterns on it or that is too bright. The best thing that you can do is try to pick clothes that are darker as these will emphasise your features.

No matter what your skin tone is, you want to try and stay away from colours that are too similar. If you don’t do this, you will end up looking washed out, and this is going to leave a poor impression on those who are making the overall decision about whether to choose you for the part. You could also try to wear colours that bring out your eyes, to really leave a good impression.

Think About Your Industry

Finally, you need to think about what kind of industry you are entering before you decide what you are going to wear. For example, if you are going into acting or modelling, then the clothes you should be wearing are going to be different from those who need a corporate headshot. Something that you can consider is looking at headshots from other people in the industry, do a little research, to give you some ideas about what to wear.


Headshots & portraits; which should I use & when?

Headshots & portraits are both photographs of a persons head & shoulders right? As a very basic principle you could be easily forgiven for the simplification, however Professional Headshot photography & Professional Portrait Photography have some key differentials. Ultimately, it comes down to a matter of technique, usage & also editing. In this post, we are going to take a look at the differences between a professional headshot and portrait in further detail. 


Aren’t headshots and portraits the same thing?

A headshot is a more neutral & professional representation of a person - the very best ones showing great personality. It is most often used in a professional setting, for example, corporate headshots are used on websites, so an audience can identify easily with the personalities in a team of people. There is a good case that every person should have an excellent headshot as part of their LinkedIn/Facebook/media profiles to maximise on all opportunities. Professional connections can easily cross over into social media so it’s a great idea to have a cohesive image across channels. Headshots are also excellent if you appear in press releases &/or editorials or appear as a speaker. Depending on the publication & if it is a creative article it may be more relevant to have a portrait represent you to your audience. Actors and models will all need to have an up-to-date outstanding headshot for their portfolios to win new work.


A headshot is a more neutral professional representation.

A headshot is a more neutral & professional representation of a person - the very best ones showing great personality. It is most often used in a professional setting, for example, corporate headshots are used on websites, so an audience can identify easily with the personalities in a team of people. There is a good case that every person should have an excellent headshot as part of their LinkedIn/Facebook/media profiles to maximise on all opportunities. Professional connections can easily cross over into social media so it’s a great idea to have a cohesive image across channels. Headshots are also excellent if you appear in press releases &/or editorials or appear as a speaker. Depending on the publication & if it is a creative article it may be more relevant to have a portrait represent you to your audience. Actors and models will all need to have an up-to-date outstanding headshot for their portfolios to win new work. 


Portraits can offer much more artistic license.

On the other hand, a portrait is designed to tell a story often utilising a setting in which the person would usually be found in - their natural habitat so to speak. It can illuminate the person who is having the photograph taken or leave more to the imagination by playing with shadows. Portraits offer a lot more flexibility in terms of how the photographs are taken. While portraits often only include head and shoulders, the crop can be a very close view of the face or from the waist up. In fact, you can even use a portrait to describe a photograph of someone’s entire figure. The difference between the two types of photography is that portraits can offer a higher degree of artistic license, whilst headshots are designed to provide a clearer view of the face & allow instant connection & recognition. Both are best when emotive & compelling.


The use of light, shade, and colour in photographs. 

When taking a portrait, it is acceptable to use light and shadows to create a compelling story. Props are used very often in portraits too - chairs/desks/outside locations/awards/city backdrops. However, with a headshot we’re looking at a photograph of the face in it’s purest sense. A truly great headshot will also show personality in a more neutral & professional manner.


The vast majority of headshots will use fairly even lighting and be edited in natural colour. After all, headshots show a true life representation of a person. On the other hand, portraits can be amazing in black and white, and many other artistic colour schemes which can be created in the editing process.


Thanks so much for reading. Let me know what you’d most prefer for yourself - a headshot, a portrait …or both for different things :)